DON COOL Hub Allows Navy & Marines to Up Their Skill Sets with 3D Printing

cool-2With the wide range of 3D printing innovations being introduced on a continual basis, it’s possible—but doubtful—you could have missed out on all that’s being put to use by the Navy today. From the advent of on-demand 3D printing to sailors creating highly functional 3D printed components for use at sea, it’s clear that the Navy is more than interested in this technology that’s just seeping into the mainstream—they are totally cool with it.

This couldn’t be demonstrated more literally than in one of their newest programs. In use now, DON COOL is a new hub for both the Navy and Marines. Web-based and centralized, it allows for a wide range of information to be put together from other sources and different tiers (federal, state, and local) regarding:

  • Certifications
  • Licenses
  • Apprenticeships
  • Growth opportunities

rexAll of these are related to corresponding occupations by both the Navy and Marines, according to Keith Boring, the Director of the US Navy’s Credentialing Opportunities On-Line (COOL). And what’s really exciting is that the organization is using the Zeus 3D printer in their latest endeavors, a machine we’ve been following since its inception.

As personnel work to get new licenses that match their skill sets in the military, whether Navy or Marines, they are able to use the DON COOL system, provided out of the Navy COOL Program Office, which is situated on an Air Force base populated by 1,000 sailors. And while many may think of the military as rigid and operating in a back to basics format, they are actually making great strides not just to see that their Navy and Marine Enlisted (Active and Reserves) are able to learn about new technology, but also that they further their careers while creating new products for life at sea.cool

 “With the help of the trusty AIO Zeus, we’ve turned a 2D sign into a 3D eye-catcher,” says Boring. “Our AIO Zeus is giving the Navy COOL program a professional appearance, and our employees happy.  And as we all know, a happy Sailor is a productive Sailor.”

zombieAnd while we’ve seen numerous parts created by sailors in the past, here in the COOL program, you can see that those in the Navy and Marines are having some fun too, from creating 3D printed busts of their entire shop staff to a steam-punk T. Rex, a zombie candy dispenser just in time for Halloween, and even a collection of 3D printed Buddhas.

Some of the designs are quite complex, but what really sets them apart is the level of finishing that was obviously involved. This new program will allow these creative sailors to have a marketable skill set in the future as well as one that they can put to use now in their current jobs. Discuss in the DON COOL forum at 3DPB.com.

[Source: AIO Robotics / Images: Keith Boring via AIO Robotics]

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Stratasys 3D Printing Allows Automotive Manufacturer to Reduce Assembly Tool Production Costs …

November 18, 2015

Opel uses Stratasys 3D printed manufacturing tools to attach production parts to its renowned ‘Adam’ car – including roof spoilers, glass roofs and the iconic lettering on the rear windows

Using its fleet of Stratasys FDM 3D Printers, the car manufacturer can 3D print assembly tools in less than 24 hours ready for use on the production line

MINNEAPOLIS & REHOVOT, Israel–(BUSINESS WIRE)– Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), the 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions company, today announced that automotive giant, Opel, is slashing manufacturing tool production costs by up to 90% using its Stratasys 3D Printers, as well as 3D printing assembly tools in less than 24 hours.

This Smart News Release features multimedia. View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20151118005077/en/

Among the assembly tools 3D printed by Opel with its Stratasys FDM 3D Printers are those used to pos ...

Among the assembly tools 3D printed by Opel with its Stratasys FDM 3D Printers are those used to position the roof onto vehicles. Photo: Stratasys

Opel was the third-largest passenger car brand in the European Union in 2014, and together with Vauxhall, sold more than a million cars. With efficient production crucial to its success, Opel’s International Technical Development Center is 3D printing a range of manufacturing and assembly tools to advance the production of its iconic ‘Adam’ hatchback car. These assembly tools are used to precisely attach different components to the car, such as the rocker molding and roof spoilers, align the iconic ‘Adam’ lettering on the rear-side window, as well as assemble the glass and retractable roofs.

“Besides the cut in tool production time and considerable cost reductions, customized tools are a third important benefit achieved with 3D printing. We are now able to produce more complex shapes than we could via conventional manufacturing. This crucially allows us to adapt the tool to the worker and the specific car,” says Sascha Holl, Virtual Simulation Engineer – Tool Design at Opel.

Since 3D printing its manufacturing tools, the company involves its assembly-line workers in the design process to improve efficiency. This allows operators to evaluate concepts, using their experience to highlight any potential issues before committing to the production of the final assembly tool for each specific car component. With Stratasys 3D printing, any required design iterations to the Opel manufacturing tools are easily accommodated in a matter of hours, eliminating costly iterations further along the production process.

“Cases like Opel emphasize the massive impact that low risk, high-reward 3D printed parts – such as manufacturing tools – can have on production efficiency,” says Andy Middleton, President, Stratasys, EMEA. “The capability to produce such items on-demand at a reduced costs can significantly accelerate time-to-production and give businesses that competitive edge. Combine that with the ability to customize tools efficiently, as well as create complex geometries, and you can see why Opel is indicative of the way in which additive manufacturing is transforming our customer’s production operations.”

To learn more about how Opel is using Stratasys 3D printed manufacturing tools to enhance the production line, watch this video.

For more than 25 years, Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ:SSYS) has been a defining force and dominant player in 3D printing and additive manufacturing – shaping the way things are made. Headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Rehovot, Israel, the company empowers customers across a broad range of vertical markets by enabling new paradigms for design and manufacturing. The company’s solutions provide customers with unmatched design freedom and manufacturing flexibility – reducing time-to-market and lowering development costs, while improving designs and communications. Stratasys subsidiaries include MakerBot and Solidscape and the Stratasys ecosystem includes 3D printers producing prototypes and parts; a wide range of 3D printing materials; parts on-demand via Stratasys Direct Manufacturing; strategic consulting and professional services; and Thingiverse/GrabCAD communities with 5+ million free design components, printable files. With 3,000 employees and 800 granted or pending additive manufacturing patents, Stratasys has received more than 30 technology and leadership awards. Visit us online at: www.stratasys.com or http://blog.stratasys.com.

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Stratasys
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Asia Pacific
Stratasys AP
Janice Lai, +852 3944 8888
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Stratasys Japan
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Source: Stratasys Ltd.

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New material allows for high volume production 3D printing

Stratasys, the maker of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, has introduced a new soluble support material that is designed to significantly reduces the time and manpower required to clean 3D printed models.

The material, called SUP706 for PolyJet triple-jetting 3D printers, makes the process of 3D printing far more efficient, so much so that it potentially now enables companies to efficiently scale-up the use of 3D printers to high volume production.

SUP706 automates post-processing of 3D printed parts with a simple two-step, soak-and-rinse process, giving users the ability to maximize productivity while achieving a low cost-per-part. High-production environments including service bureaus and internal prototyping shops will experience a faster and easier support material removal process.

“The development of SUP706 provides a great combination of advantages for 3D printing users,” said David Tulipman, director of product management for PolyJet consumables at Stratasys.

“Owners of PolyJet-based 3D printers can now print small, intricate features with greater reassurance, and clean several parts at once, enabling high volume 3D printing that’s both cost-effective and hassle-free.”

Harder, Stronger, Better

Also recently added to the Stratasys material portfolio is ULTEM 1010 Resin for the Fortus 3D Production Systems.

This high-performance thermoplastic offers the best heat resistance, tensile strength and chemical resistance of any fused deposition modelling (FDM) thermoplastic.

Ideal for aerospace, automotive, food processing and medical device applications, ULTEM 1010 resin combines strength and thermal stability for advanced industrial tooling.

The Manufacturer has partnered with Stratasys to produce a webinar to further explain the transformational benefits of 3D printing, specifically for injection moulding, jigs and fixtures, End of Arm Tools and production parts.

The webinar is taking place on December 3 at 2pm (BST). Click here to register.

The webinar will show how UK-based additive manufacturing experts, FDM Digital, developed ground breaking tooling applications for major aerospace and automotive OEMs and saves up to 70% on its tooling costs. Check out the video below from FDM Digital for more information.