SpiderMaker 3D Printer PLA Filament – Matte Finish with Incredible Vibrant Colors – 1.75 mm, 700g (Sun Orange) / (CMYK: 0/73/88/0)

Upgrade your PLA printing with a matte finish filament
3D printing is incredible, but run of the mill PLA can make your prints look like … well, look like plastic! Matte finish PLA from SpiderMaker takes 3D printing to the next level of aesthetics and quality with great looking matte texture and gorgeous colors.

A matte finish lets your designs really stand out with rich details that would get glossed over by the way regular PLA reflects light, also helping to make layer lines less obvious. The visual effect is striking enough, but SpiderMaker Matte Finish PLA also feels great with its matte texture. Thanks to these aspects, SpiderMaker Matte Finish PLA gives you a much more refined end product.

SpiderMaker Matte Finish PLA is also great in applications where reflectivity matters, such as in making hoods and surrounds for camera lenses. This PLA also enjoys the same great properties of PLA, such as low odor,
Notes
– Be sure to keep the filament coiled tightly on the spool in order to avoid tangles/binding.

Specifications

  • Diameter: 1.75mm
  • Weight: 700g (1.54 lb)
  • Printing temperature: 210~230℃
  • Printing speed: 10-60mm/s (0.4″-2.3″ / second)
  • Material: matte PLA
  • Suggested Printing Temperature: 410°F – 446°F (210°C-230°C)
  • Colors: Coal Black, Paper White, Dark Slate Gray, Jujube Red, Coral Red, Brick Red, Sun Orange, Cheese Yellow, Peacock Green, Emerald Green, Wasabi Green, Iron Blue, Steel Blue, Orchid Purple, Mauve Purple, Kraft Brown, Clay, Iron Gray

Product Features

  • EXCELLENT TEXTURE – High quality matte SpiderMaker PLA filament with no glossy plastic look.
  • INCREDIBLE TOUGHNESS – Not brittle and with great tensile strength, SpiderMaker filament fiber suffers from less breakage for great printing performance compared to common PLA filament.
  • LOW STRINGING – Easy to print with less stringing. SpiderMaker PLA matte series saves you time on post-processing.
  • EASILY REMOVABLE SUPPORTS – Supports made with this filament are fast and easy to remove, with minimal surfacing needed after removal.
  • VERSATILE APPLICATIONS – SpiderMaker filament can be used for a broad range of 3D printing applications.

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The Incredible 3D Printed Zoetrope

zoe-smooth

Here’s a wonderfully neat project to perhaps spark some creativity as we head into this holiday weekend: the 3D printed Zoetrope.

Take the concept of a flipbook — a series of frames displayed quickly to trick your brain into seeing an animation — and make it 3D, swapping out the still images for sculptures. Toss in a spinning platter and a strobe light (with the strobe flicker simulating “frames”) and bam — you’ve got a 3D zoetrope.

It’s an illusion that’s hard to capture on video, but truly incredible to see in person. It’s like seeing claymation come to life in front of your eyes.

The concept was conceived by French scientist and inventor Étienne Jules-Marey, and more recently cranked up to 11 by teams at Pixar and Studio Ghibli.

There’s a reason that the best examples of a 3D zoetrope exist as museum showcases for massive animation houses: making a proper, beautiful, complex 3D zoetrope is a labor of love, thus far requiring hundreds of sculpting/painting/engineering hours from some of the most talented animation teams in the world.

Dutch artist Klaas-Harm de Boer and the folks at Leapfrog have found a bit of a shortcut: 3D printing.

It’s still one helluva project to dive into, but it shows but one of the strange ways 3D printing expands our creative freedoms. Take a short 3D animation, break it into 64 separate frames, 3D print each one and arrange them around a platter. Tada! You’ve got your very own zoetrope.

Want more examples of how damned cool these things can be?

Here’s Pixar’s (from Disney’s California Adventure in Anaheim):

and here’s Studio Ghibli’s (from the Ghibli Museum in Mitaka, Japan):

If you get a chance to see any of these in person, I’d suggest you go however far out of your way is necessary to do so. It’s really quite incredible.

Father Creates Incredible 3D Printed Star Wars Rebels AT-DP Helmet for Son

Jon Watson's 3D Printed Star Wars Rebels Helmet

Jon Watson’s 3D Printed Star Wars Rebels Helmet

Star Wars is a franchise which has been around for over three and a half decades. Just when you think it may begin fizzling out, something else pops up even more impressive than we have seen before. George Lucas was incredibly brilliant in his creation of Star Wars, but even he could not have had any idea how successful the franchise would end up being. 1977 was the start for Star Wars, with the original film debuting on May 25 of that year. 2015 brings the latest film to us, in the form of Star Wars: The Force Awakens. With two more films already planned for 2017 and 2019 (Star Wars Episode VIII & Star Wars Episode IX), we certainly won’t see the end of this epic series anytime soon.

It’s not just movies that have garnered the attention of Star Wars fans however. There is memorabilia, trade shows, and even a CGI TV series called Star Wars Rebels. The series, which is set approximately 15 years after Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, takes place in a time when the Galactic Empire is securing its control of the galaxy. The series has gained quite a following, and also doesn’t appear to be ending anytime soon.

For one little boy in Missoula, Montana, all he wanted to be for Halloween was an AT-DP pilot from this very Star Wars Rebels series. Unfortunately though, he could not find a helmet anywhere. This is when his father, Jon Watson, stepped in to lend a helping hand in a major way.

“I almost just bought him a Storm Trooper helmet, but he had a specific helmet in mind,” Watson tells 3DPrint.com. “It was an AT-DP pilot helmet he saw on the show Star Wars Rebels.”

Off the print bed

Off the print bed

So, Watson decided to take things into his own hands, and design the helmet for his son from the ground up. It took him about four days to create a 3D model of the helmet using Autodesk 3ds Max, by referencing images he found on Google and looking at stills from the show. Once the model was created, Watson began taking the steps needed to 3D print it.

“It took another few hours to prepare it for printing,” explained Watson. “Making sure pieces were separated so they would fit on the printer, making sure the model had a nice smooth inner surface, and also making sure it was solid, as to not create errors when slicing.”

Primed

Primed

It was then off to the printer for Watson’s design. This was a very time consuming process, as it took over 100 hours to print out the entire helmet on his Type A Machines Series 1 3D printer. The helmet itself, the face mask, and the lower rim of the helmet, each took about 36 hours each to print out. The little round ear pieces that are attached to the helmet were cut out on his CNC router, and the lenses were cut from cheap goggles that Watson purchased from Walmart.

3D printing the helmet was not the final step though. Once printed, Watson had to take many steps to post-process it, in order to make it look as similar to its counterpart from the TV series as possible.

15_finished

“The way I smooth out the surface is [with] lots of coats of high build filler primer. Then I sand it back down until I hit the plastic, and then primer again until smooth,” he tells us. “This works better and is easier than just sanding the PLA. PLA does not sand well. You really have to wet sand it for best results. The final paint was Krylon Fusion satin white and satin black.”

As you can see in the photos, the helmet turned out better than anyone could have expected, and Watson’s son was obviously very pleased with the results.

What do you think about this 3D printed helmet? Would you have done anything differently? Discuss in the 3D Printed Star Wars Rebels AT-DP Helmet forum thread on 3DPB.com.