Orion Motor Tech Auto-Leveling 3D Printer with Resume Printing Function, 2.8-Inch Sensitive Touch Screen, and Filament Detection, Stable Structure Sealed Metal Plates 220x220x250mm

Product Features

  • ASSEMBLED IN ADVANCE: Getting set to create with this printer is a total snap-after all, it comes almost entirely set up to begin with! We put together the unit in its entirety right at our factory, meaning once it arrives at your door you just have to put it in your workshop or creative corner and perform a minimal installation lasting less than 30 minutes. That’s sure to save you time and headaches alike.
  • FULLY FUNCTIONAL: Form blends perfectly with function in this printer. The unit features an auto-leveling capability to balance its frame out automatically. With resume printing, it’ll pick up where it left off in the event of a power outage; plus, its built-in filament detection will stop it from printing in the event of internal malfunction. Combine that with an auto filament dispenser and a colorful 2.8″ touchscreen and you have a safe, responsive tool for all your projects.
  • SLICK AND STURDY: Every creation starts with a sturdy foundation when you use this printer. Its integrated body is crafted with a firm, stable structure sporting sealed metal plates in the base and a hot bed equipped with PCB and tempered glass. That solid construction lets its hot bed ramp up to 100℃ in just 5 minutes-adding convenience to its smart, safe design. And thanks to its tempered glass exterior and a sleek, artistic design, the whole unit takes on a smooth feel and a sharp look beside
  • INNER POWER: The force with this printer is far from skin-deep. Purring just under its polished case lies a cutting-edge industrial-grade motherboard to power its every operation, including its reliable overcurrent and overload protection features that kick in automatically for added safety in the workshop. Plus, anytime you need to upgrade its features, you can just copy the file to a memory card and fit it into the printer for an offline install.
  • PRINT LIKE A PRO: Smooth, swift, and nearly silent-the pro-level design of this printer ensures your every creation comes expertly made, with nothing but easy operation in the process. Both the Z- and Y-axis on the machine make use of a V-shaped groove for their wheels, allowing for fluid movement at every moment. The design even ensures the printer glides along with minimal noise and maximum stability, precisely plotting out every point of your printed masterpieces.

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3D Printer Adhesive Glue by Layerneer, Bed Weld Original, Strong Grip Reduces Warping for ABS, PLA, and PETG Filament on Heated Build Plates, 4 oz.

Do you have trouble with parts warping or coming detached from the printer bed?

Have you struggled with part removal after printing is finished?

Introducing BED WELD – ORIGINAL™

BED WELD was engineered to solve these challenges by enhancing your print surface so that it grabs hold of that critical first layer when your build surface is hot, and refuses to let go with its gecko like grip. In many cases you can often print without rafts or build plate adhesion layers, saving you time and material.

Once your part is finished the coating dynamically morphs as your printer bed cools, releasing its hold so you don’t have to wrestle to get your part off.

No more chipped glass or broken parts. In most cases, your part will fully detach without the need for tools. In the event the part does remain attached it normally takes just a simple lifting of a corner using the edge of a razor as a lever, and the part easily pops off.

BED WELD comes with a unique built-in applicator that makes applying the coating a simple no mess process. The coating dries quickly to form a thin film that is not sticky, so there is no risk of getting a clogged nozzle or having residue on your finished part.

NOTE: The BED WELD coating was designed for use with heated build plates made from glass or aluminum and was optimized to work with PLA, ABS, PETG, PVA, and CPE filament types. Not recommended for use with Nylon, PP, or TPU 95A. See image for compatibility summary. Applying to build plates that have other surface coatings, such as magnetic build plates, or tape, is not recommended.

BED WELD is backed by an unconditional 90-Day money back manufacturers guarantee, so you risk nothing!

Product Features

  • THERMAL DYNAMIC COATING – No magic, just science; Parts stick at hot and release when cooled; Dries fast and non tacky so it won’t clog your nozzle with goo
  • LONG LASTING – Print several times on a single coat; recharge with a wet sponge to get more prints out of a single application; Cost pennies per print
  • LOW ODOR & WATER SOLUBLE – No harsh smells; No headaches; Easy to touch up or remove with water
  • NO-MESS APPLICATOR – Built in foam tip makes applying the coating to your build plate surface simple and it won’t accidentally spill
  • 90-DAY MANUFACTURER GUARANTEE – If this solution does not work for your 3D printing application, you have a FULL 3 MONTHS to contact us for a 100% money-back refund

Detailed Information available on our Homepage…

Proximal third humeral shaft fractures fixed with long helical PHILOS plates in elderly patients

The optimal treatment for humeral shaft fracture remains controversial. Although a large proportion of these fractures can be treated without surgery, a recent study, involving a randomized controlled trial, compared bridge plate with functional brace fixation for humeral shaft fractures and concluded that surgical plating has a statistically significant advantage with a better DASH score, lower non-union rate, and lower residual deformity rate [1]. As for proximal third humeral shaft fractures, they were thought to be complicated with a higher non-union rate when treated conservatively compared with middle and distal fractures [2, 5, 16]. Since the helical plating technique was introduced for the treatment of humeral fractures, some studies have shown that this technique resulted in increased stiffness compared to fixation with a straight plate under torsional loading and produced satisfactory clinical outcomes [14, 17]. However, how to produce a suitable helical plate for each individual patient is a big question for surgeons. Previous studies have proven that the 3D printing technique is a good tool for designing surgical plans and pre-contouring plates used to treat other bone fractures [18–20]. Our results demonstrate the benefit of pre-contouring plates on a 3D-printed model for this special technique.

In this study, all kinds of fractures (from type A to type C) were treated by helical plating technique, and satisfactory outcomes were obtained. It was coincident with our previous cadaveric study results [11], so we thought this special technique was a good choice for these fractures. Previously, Stedtfeld and Biber reported that approximately 49.3% of the proximal third humeral shaft fractures extend into the humeral head and that this type of fracture cannot be characterized by conventional AO classification [6]. In our study, a total of 41.3% (19/46) of fractures involved the proximal humerus, a rate slightly lower compared with their report, but still a high rate of these fractures. Consequently, attention should be paid on the proximal third humeral shaft fractures since about half of them need adequate proximal fixation.

At the 1-year follow-up visit, all fractures were healed and none of the patients had suffered non-union, an outcome better than that reported for other treatment methods [1, 2, 5, 9, 21–23]. The mean union times of the Synbone group and the 3D-printed groups were 16.16 and 15.57 weeks, respectively, which was similar to other studies even though our patients were older than in other studies [11, 17, 24]. Functional evaluations were satisfactory but were worse than those reported by others who conducted the same surgeries (Constant-Murley score 76.80, 76.95 vs. 88.6) [13, 17]. This may be attributed to the fact that our population was much older, so that humeral fracture might be combined with rotator cuff degeneration in our enrolled patients.

The primary outcomes of this study were that surgical duration and blood loss were reduced by the use of a 3D-printed model for pre-contouring the plates before surgery. This result was consistent with our hypothesis and can be explained by the fact that the humeri of older patients in our country are much shorter than the standard Synbone, requiring surgeons to adjust the plates during surgery. Since the 3D-printed model represented the actual size of the bone, the plates pre-contoured on these models were always suitable for fixing the fractures. Because of MIPO technique application, there was only 15 ml of blood loss difference between the two groups; maybe it was not clinically relevant, but on the whole, it reduced 12.5% of blood loss volume and presented a small part of the benefit of 3D-printed technique.

We compared the outcomes between the two grades of surgeons in the 3D-printed group. Although senior attending doctors are much more experienced than junior attending doctors, the results showed that there was no significant difference between them in terms of outcome. We believed that the 3D printing technique would make this novel technique much easier and make it available for use by less specialized surgeons. However, since all fractures in the Synbone group were finished by senior attending doctors, it was impossible to compare the results with a control group.

There are some limitations to this study: (I) the retrospective design limits the level of evidence and only represents one single center; (II) some patients who died within 1 year of surgery are excluded from this study, which may influence the final results; (III) all these surgeries were finished by surgeons in one trauma center, so personal differences cannot be avoided; and (IV) this study only included Asian population, and maybe the results could be challenged by other races because of different skeletal sizes.