Frankensbox fx-800 3D Printer, Wi-Fi, Compact, Quiet, Accurate, Plug and Play Simplicity, (Black)

Frankensbox: What will you CREATE 

Will it be beautiful? Will it be ugly? 

Creativity is not about perfection, it’s about imagination. Frankensbox connects your imagination to reality. 

Beautiful or ugly, it’s your creation!

Create now

As great as 3D printing is, getting started can be understandably a bit daunting. So who wants their initial out of box experience to involve hours of assembling dozens of parts (and hoping their untested machine actually works), then more time and tweaking for setup and calibration? 

We don’t either. We like to think, “plug in, install the app, then you’re off to the races,” is the way things are supposed to work these days.

Be better

3D printer companies talk about the speeds their printers can achieve, usually in terms of mm/sec. The reality is that reasonably large and high-quality pieces can take hours.

If your project is going to take hours, your printer better be quiet. And any noise it does make better be soft and pleasant. 

It better be compact enough not to take over your work area. And have a design that isn’t an eyesore.

It better be fully enclosed to keep out dirt and paws and small fingers. It better be smart enough to auto-pause when the door is opened. And to auto-resume after the door is closed again. Or after power is restored, were it ever to go out.

Also in the box

Spool of filament, SD card, SD card adapter, USB cable, power cable, spatula, hex wrenches , Quick Start Guide.

Featuring

Print Material: PLA ABS Wood PC PVC

One Button Leveling

One Button Printing

Wi-Fi Connection

Ultra Quiet (< 50dB)

Removable Platform

No Platform Heat Needed

Print Size: 150 x 150 x 175 mm

Print Resolution: 0.1 mm

Nozzle Temp: to 250º C

Print Speed: to 150 mm/s

Product Features

  • Easiest to Start, Easiest to Operate: Unpack, plug in, load the app and go!
  • Safe, Clean, Quiet, Compact: Great for the home, office, or classroom
  • Wi-Fi, USB, SD Card Slot: Print from iOS & Android devices, PC, Mac or included SD card
  • Excellent Print Quality: Smooth, accurate, high resolution
  • 1-Year Warranty with USA-Based Support

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3D-printed 'Spock' hand lets young amputee play basketball again

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f109647%2faioprostheticarmpicAn engineer holding the 3D-printed “Spock” hand.

Image: AIO Robotics

Live long and play basketball.

It’s not exactly what Star Trek’s pointy-eared Vulcan had in mind when he raised his hand in the now-familiar Vulcan salute, but surely he’d appreciate the sentiment — especially when it refers to a young amputee who can now dribble a basketball and shoot baskets again thanks to a 3D-printed prosthesis that makes it look as if the boy is simultaneously shooting and giving the Vulcan greeting.

The prosthetic hand gets its signature look from its very specific design purpose: playing basketball. So instead of five fingers, there are just three, two of which are spread apart in the familiar Vulcan salute to fit around a basketball. Every finger tip is covered in rubber to provide a better grip and to give the right backspin during a shot.

The Spock hand in use

The Spock hand in use.

Image: AIO robotics

The masterminds behind this one-of-a-kind prosthetic are the members at the UCLA chapter of 3D for Everyone (3D4E), a team of 3D printing and prototyping enthusiasts. 

Along with the UCLA Women’s basketball team and the Biomedical Engineering Society, 3D4E at UCLA started working on project late last year with the goal of giving children with hand deformities the chance to play basketball.   

They eventually found out about a little boy named Logan and his desire to play basketball again, a feat virtually impossible with most traditional prosthesis, and set about designing something special.

According to AIO Robotics, the company that makes the 3D printer (a Zeus All in One) the team used to print all the Spock-hand pieces, 3D4E started with a design from the E-enabling the Future team, another group of 3D tinkerers with a history of designing and giving away 3D-printed prosthesis for amputees. 3D-printed prostheses can cost thousands of dollars less than their custom-built counterparts.

dribbling

The Spock hand is built to dribble.

Image: aio robotics

The design not only features the unusual finger configuration, but springs to help it mimic the whipping motion in the wrist needed to make a basketball shot and even the ability to dribble a basketball.

Last week, 3D4E finished a ‘Spock” hand prototype and invited Logan to the UCLA campus to test it. After a slow start, Logan reportedly made 17 baskets.

Shoot long and sink the three-pointer, indeed.

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Printrbot Printrbot Play 1505 – White Assembled 3D Printer, White

The Printrbot Play (Model 1505) fully assembled 3D fused-filament-fabrication printer with metal frame has an open platform for fabricating parts up to 4 x 4 x 5 inches (W x D x H) using 1.75-mm PLA filament (sold separately). The print head moves on the X (left to right) axis and Z (up and down) axes, while the bed moves on the Y (backward and forward). The print bed is a metal plate and includes an auto-leveling probe that works with the user-chosen computer software to provide a level print surface. The printer uses open source software and connects to the computer using the included micro-USB cable. Using a micro-SD card (sold separately), the printer can be disconnected from the computer after initialization for untethered printing. Maximum resolution of 100 microns. The printer includes a sample of filament.

Product Features

  • Metal construction for rigidity and consistent print results
  • Fan shroud and extruder cover to prevent children from touching the hot end
  • 4″ x 4″ x 5″ build volume

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