Functional Design for 3D Printing: Designing 3d printed things for everyday use – 3rd edition

Functional Design for 3D Printing 3rd Edition is your guide to the intersection of design, 3d printing, and utility. This volume will demonstrate design practices that expand the possibilities for durable, functional objects. Your functional models will print quickly and reliably, delivering the full potential of the “desktop factory”. Functional Design for 3D Printing will help you to: Turn your ideas into practical designs that print reliably and assemble into durable, functional objects Maximize strength for utility and estimate working and failure load ratings Minimize printing time, material use, and weight Minimize the chance of print failure, ensuring reliable prints on a variety of machines and software Design printable hinges, latches, interlocking parts, and other functional elements Design printable electronic breadboards, prototypes, and simple components Integrate flexibility and multiple materials into your functional designs Solve bed adhesion and warping problems at the design level, improving print reliability Select the correct structural paradigm(s) for each application Know how and when to include dedicated support structures into your model for maximum printability If you are an experienced designer, Functional Design for 3D Printing will present design principles and practices that will help you to quickly model functional, printable objects. This volume will help you to improve and accelerate your design and prototyping work-flow. If you are a novice designer, Functional Design for 3D Printing will be a useful introduction, supplement, and reference for functional design. This volume will give you the technical framework for you to improve your expertise with a minimum of trial and error frustration, and will be your go-to guide for design solutions. 118 illustrations, 234 pages. This third edition is extensively improved and expanded from the second edition: More than twice as many illustrations and 35% more text Extensively rewritten for easier reading and comprehension Updated with modern materials and technologies Some words of praise from purchasers of the second edition: “Unlike many other currently available books about 3D printing which are heavy with ra-ra encouragements about how great 3D printing is and how everyone can excel with a little effort, this book is simply page after page of useful information about the nitty-gritty aspects of actually trying to print good models. This is the kind of knowledge that beginning (and experienced) enthusiasts need to know to avoid any potential frustrations. Don’t be put off by the rather short length of this book; there’s more here than most other books that are hundreds of pages longer. Highly recommended.” “Lots of solid information on best design practice and material properties. It’s written in such a way that the information won’t be out of date for a long time. If you’re experienced at 3D printing this book will reaffirm the things you learned through trial and error, and probably teach you a few tricks you never thought of. If you’re new to 3d printing, or new at designing parts that will be 3D printed, this book will save you a ton of time and materials.” “This book provides a wealth of rules, guidelines, and insights to help you create designs that print and behave properly. It does a wonderful job of explaining all the strange effects that can make even simple prints fail, and how to easily minimize or compensate for them.” ….. “ As others here have suggested, buy the print version so you can highlight it and keep it next to your printer.”

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USB Heated 3D Printer Finishing Tool With 4 Coated Tips Designed To Finish, Repair and Modify 3D Printed Parts, Soldering Iron Tool

USB powered heated tool with long life soldering tip, with LED indicator light and touch switch. Includes coated interchangeable tips designed to finish, repair and modify 3D printed parts. Replaces much of the sanding, scraping and snapping tool to finish off your 3d prints. Designed to finish 3D printing models. Fully functioning USB powered soldering iron. Small and compact for portability. Rapid heat up and instant recovery. Long life tip can be easily replaced and has protective cap. 4 interchangeable tips included: needle, knife, scoop and point. Special tip coating to prevent sticking. Basic stand included. Power: 8 W. Input: 5 VDC USB 2.0 / 3.0 recommended. Highest heating temperature: 380°C – 400°C , 716°F – 752°F. Heating time: < 15 seconds. Cooling time: < 30 seconds. Auto Shut Off (sleep mode): 25 seconds idle. LED indicator: Yes

Product Features

  • PRECISE: The pen like form makes it very comfortable to use and easy to control when precision is important. Works with PLA, ABS and other 3D printing materials.
  • REPLACES: The sanding, scraping and snapping tool to finish off your 3d prints.
  • 4 SPECIALLY COATED TIPS: 4 interchangeable tips included: needle, knife, scoop and point. Tips have special coating to prevent plastic sticking to the tip.
  • TIPS INCLUDE: KNIFE for cutting and removing sections including the removal of supports, brims, and rafts from your 3D print; NEEDLE: for clearing small holes and features or for detailed layer refinements in hard to reach places; POINT: general purpose tip for larger internal features and holes. Can also be used to make holes after printing; SCOOP: perfect to remove stringing and imperfections from inside holes or recesses. Can also be used to blend surfaces
  • COMPACT: Small and compact for portability. Size: 0.59″ x 6.06″ – 15 x 117 mm (without tips). Weight: 4.23 oz – 120 g

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Creating New Compounds For 3D Printed Medical Devices

A new biomaterial company,  FibreTuff, has announced plans to begin manufacturing cellulose-based biomaterials that are biocompatible, absorbable, and nondegradable for Class I and II medical devices. The company’s PAPC ingredients can be compounded into pellets to make 3D printing filament that can be used to print a variety of medical devices and implants.

“FibreTuff compounds biomaterials that contain cellulose and blends them with thermoplastics branded as PAPC (polyamide, polyolefin, and cellulose) compositions for use in Class I [and] II and eventually Class III permanent implants for the medical industry,� explained FibreTuff founder and president Robert Joyce. “We’ve now brought on partners, purchased manufacturing equipment, and now leased space in a facility located in West Unity, Ohio.�

FibreTuff’s PAPC filament can be used in 3D printers without the odors traditionally associated with the printing process. The biomaterial will also cost about 30% less for device makers in need of things like cervical spacers and other implantable devices. The material also has the huge advantage of being “radiopaque,� meaning it can be seen on an x-ray without requiring additives like other products on the market.

“You can see in an x-ray where the tissues and bone grow into the implant made with PAPC,� Joyce said. “Our FibreTuff PAPC is a hydrophilic compound that is coating friendly to support a printed circuits design and construction through an ink process by nScrypt located in Orlando, Florida. Even the specific gravity of the compound is 20% lighter than [that of] other materials currently on the market, which can translate into lower material costs to produce 3D printed parts.�

Among the other characteristics of the FibreTuff filament are that it will not dissolve inside the body and has already passed USP Class VI testing performed by NAMSA for implantation, the company reported in a news release. The filament also has a weight and composition very similar to actual human bone, which could suit it for 3D printing bones for academic use in medical school.

“The human bones that are 3D printed with FibreTuff PAPC offer similar features to an actual human experience, having good screw retention and sawing and cutting ability,� Joyce said. “Other 3D printed resins have challenges with these types of features, but we have the flexibility to print different sizes of human bone that actually resemble real human bones. A local university has been using pig and cow bones for their medical students to practice on, but we are aiming to have the students 3D print bones with FibreTuff PAPC that they can actually practice on.�

While the company officially launched operations within the last week, the company has spent the last four years not only developing the technology, but also recruiting partners and taking orders. Now that it is moving toward a new phase in sales and marketing, Joyce said that the company hopes to begin producing PAPC implants within the next 16 months.

“Approximately 16 months from now we hope to have PAPC in permanent implants for spine, trauma, and sports medicine that can show much improved osseointegration versus PEEK and metal implants,� he said. “We also hope to begin reducing the cost to produce these types of implants by 30%. We want to work with hospitals, colleges and universities, and medical device manufacturers to develop a new way to deliver education and functional tools and models to the medical market.�