Gizmo Dorks 1.75mm HIPS Filament 1kg / 2.2lb for 3D Printers, White

Gizmo Dorks
We provide the highest quality 3D printing materials such as ABS, PLA, HIPS, PVA, and more. Our filaments are run with tight tolerances. There are no air bubbles or oily residues. Every filament comes loaded on a durable, hard plastic spool, not a cheap, flimsy cardboard spool.

HIPS, High Impact Polystyrene, is very similar to ABS. They share a lot of the same characteristics and qualities. However, HIPS is used with different solvents versus ABS. Limonene is used with HIPS instead of Acetone for ABS. Since Limonene does not affect ABS, HIPS is commonly used as a supporting material. HIPS is versatile, economical, and impact resistant.

Compatible with RepRap, Makerbot, UP!, Lulzbot, Afinia, Solidoodle, MakerGear, Printrbot LC, and more!

FAQ?
Is the spindle hole large enough to fit my Makerbot printer?
Yes! Our spindle holes are large enough to fit the Makerbot printers. You don’t have to worry about fabricating a spindle extension any longer. *NOTE, these spools will not fit inside of the new Makerbot 5th generation printer drawers. You can still use these spools and feed the filament directly through the top of the printer.

What are some printing tips?
Please use Kapton tape or 3M blue tape. Please use in well ventilated areas.

What other colors are available?
HIPS comes in a variety of different vibrant colors, 12 different options total.

Product Features

  • 1.75mm diameter, 1kg net weight, HIPS Filament
  • Filament Roundness: +/- 0.07mm
  • Filament Diameter: +/- 0.05mm
  • Recommended Print Temperature: 210 – 230°C, depending on printer model
  • Compatible with RepRap, Makerbot, Afinia, Solidoodle or any standard spool based 3D printer

Check Out Our Website For Details…

Wisamic Clear Borosilicate Glass Heat Bed 200x200x3mm for 3D Printers Prusa, Monoprice Maker Select V2, Monoprice Maker Select Plus, etc

If you want to make your printing platform flat enough, ideal stuff is glass sheet. Tempered Silicon glass is rated for higher temperatures than normal sheet glass making it a better material for use as a heated bed. After cracking a few sheets of normal glass from rapidly cooling or heating, tempered glass will quell your frustrations.

Features:
* Borosilicate is a very high temperature glass. It has a melt temperature of about 800° C and a very low thermal expansion coefficient.
* Resistant to thermal shock compared to regular glass.
* Prepare a second plate and quickly switchplates when a model finishes printing. This significantly reduces printer idle time between prints.
* Reduces warping, however platform has to be properly leveled as is the case with any platform on a 3D printer.

Specification:
Material: 100% Borosilicate
Size: 200x200x3mm
Thickness: 3mm

Package content:
1 x 200x200x3x3mm Borosilicate Glass

Product Features

  • Precisely cut and tempered with high transparence. Resistance to scratch and thermal shock.
  • Conducts heat evenly across the build surface to ensure consistent temperature throughout the build surface.
  • High binding power when heating. Easy to separate the plastic parts when cooling.
  • Get you out of the trouble when plastic film decreased viscosity after a period of usage.
  • Specially designed to fit the 3D Printers Prusa, Monoprice Maker Select V2, Monoprice Maker Select Plus, etc

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GM bets on 3D printers for cheaper and lighter car parts

DETROIT (Reuters) – General Motors Co said on Thursday it was working with design software company Autodesk Inc to manufacture new, lightweight 3D-printed parts that could help the automaker meet its goals to add alternative-fuel vehicles to its product lineup.

FILE PHOTO – A Chevrolet Bolt EV vehicle is seen on the assembly line at General Motors Orion Assembly in Lake Orion, Michigan, U.S., March 19, 2018. Photo taken March 19, 2018. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Last year, the company announced ambitious plans to add 20 new electric battery and fuel cell vehicles to its global lineup by 2023. Chief Executive Mary Barra has made a bold promise to investors that the Detroit automaker will make money selling electric cars by 2021.

The ability to print lightweight parts could be a gamechanger for the electric vehicle industry. With consumer concerns over the limited range of electric vehicles a major obstacle to their mass adoption, making them lighter improves fuel efficiency and could help extend that range.

GM executives this week showed off a 3D-printed stainless steel seat bracket developed with Autodesk technology – which uses cloud computing and artificial intelligence-based algorithms to rapidly explore multiple permutations of a part design.

Using conventional technology, the part would require eight components and several suppliers. With this new system, the seat bracket consists of one part – which looks like a mix between abstract art and science fiction movie – that is 40 percent lighter and 20 percent stronger.

Other manufacturers such as General Electric Co have also beefed up their use of 3D printers in manufacturing. GM rival automaker Ford Motor Co said last year it was testing lightweight 3D printing for mass production.

GM has used 3D printers for prototyping for years, but Kevin Quinn, the automaker’s director of additive design and manufacturing, said within a year or so GM expects these new 3D-printed parts to appear in high-end, motorsports applications. Within five years, GM hopes to produce thousands or tens of thousands of parts at scale as the technology improves, Quinn said.

“That is our panacea,� Quinn said. “That’s what we want to get to.�

In the long run, Quinn said the 3D printed parts would help reduce tooling costs, cut the amount of material used, the number of suppliers needed for one part and logistics costs.

The 3D-printing based manufacturing industry is working toward mass production and trying to address issues with “repeatability and robustness,� said Bob Yancey, Autodesk’s director of manufacturing.

GM getting into the game “will put tremendous pressure� to make that happen, Yancey said.

Reporting By Nick Carey, Editing by Rosalba O’Brien