Functional Design for 3D Printing: Designing 3d printed things for everyday use – 3rd edition

Functional Design for 3D Printing 3rd Edition is your guide to the intersection of design, 3d printing, and utility. This volume will demonstrate design practices that expand the possibilities for durable, functional objects. Your functional models will print quickly and reliably, delivering the full potential of the “desktop factory”. Functional Design for 3D Printing will help you to: Turn your ideas into practical designs that print reliably and assemble into durable, functional objects Maximize strength for utility and estimate working and failure load ratings Minimize printing time, material use, and weight Minimize the chance of print failure, ensuring reliable prints on a variety of machines and software Design printable hinges, latches, interlocking parts, and other functional elements Design printable electronic breadboards, prototypes, and simple components Integrate flexibility and multiple materials into your functional designs Solve bed adhesion and warping problems at the design level, improving print reliability Select the correct structural paradigm(s) for each application Know how and when to include dedicated support structures into your model for maximum printability If you are an experienced designer, Functional Design for 3D Printing will present design principles and practices that will help you to quickly model functional, printable objects. This volume will help you to improve and accelerate your design and prototyping work-flow. If you are a novice designer, Functional Design for 3D Printing will be a useful introduction, supplement, and reference for functional design. This volume will give you the technical framework for you to improve your expertise with a minimum of trial and error frustration, and will be your go-to guide for design solutions. 118 illustrations, 234 pages. This third edition is extensively improved and expanded from the second edition: More than twice as many illustrations and 35% more text Extensively rewritten for easier reading and comprehension Updated with modern materials and technologies Some words of praise from purchasers of the second edition: “Unlike many other currently available books about 3D printing which are heavy with ra-ra encouragements about how great 3D printing is and how everyone can excel with a little effort, this book is simply page after page of useful information about the nitty-gritty aspects of actually trying to print good models. This is the kind of knowledge that beginning (and experienced) enthusiasts need to know to avoid any potential frustrations. Don’t be put off by the rather short length of this book; there’s more here than most other books that are hundreds of pages longer. Highly recommended.” “Lots of solid information on best design practice and material properties. It’s written in such a way that the information won’t be out of date for a long time. If you’re experienced at 3D printing this book will reaffirm the things you learned through trial and error, and probably teach you a few tricks you never thought of. If you’re new to 3d printing, or new at designing parts that will be 3D printed, this book will save you a ton of time and materials.” “This book provides a wealth of rules, guidelines, and insights to help you create designs that print and behave properly. It does a wonderful job of explaining all the strange effects that can make even simple prints fail, and how to easily minimize or compensate for them.” ….. “ As others here have suggested, buy the print version so you can highlight it and keep it next to your printer.”

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Michael Weinberg Leads Us Through 3 Steps for Licensing 3D Printed Things

screen-shot-2017-01-29-at-7-41-21-pmAs more and more people become involved in 3D printing, more and more awesome stuff is being created. The question that naturally arises after any particularly amazing print, or after a case of beer, whichever comes first, is how do I copyright this so that I eventually become a millionaire? I may be paraphrasing a bit, but understanding how exactly to license the cool stuff you have worked so hard to produce is actually an important question.

In 2015, Michael Weinberg released a white paper that really got into the nitty gritty of what is actually possible in terms of licensing, and specifically in terms of open licenses, like the ones offered through Creative Commons. This is the kind of advice you should take to heart because it comes from someone with scads of legal expertise in 3D printing, no other than Shapeways’ general counsel.

screen-shot-2017-01-29-at-7-39-19-pmWhat Weinberg does in this paper is break down the process for deciding to copyright (or not) into three steps. The first is to determine what pieces or parts, if any, of your creation or its file might be eligible for copyright protection. Not every unique thing is something that can be copyrighted. In some cases, only individual parts of the overall creation could be copyrighted; in others, it might only be possible to copyright the digital file and not the object itself.

The second step in the copyright journey is to make sure that you understand what it is that a copyright does, and does not, do. This is an area that is often a quagmire of confusion as people are prone to believe that holding a copyright, in any form, on a digital file bestows upon them despotic control over the use of that file and/or the object that it is used to create. As Weinberg explains:

“Understanding what your copyright allows you to control – and what remains out of your control – is critical to thinking about how to license things. For example, you may have a copyright on a file that represents an object, but not on the object itself. In that case, you should be clear-eyed about the fact that even the most restrictive license on the file will not stop people from reproducing the object without your permission.”

screen-shot-2017-01-29-at-7-40-26-pmThe third, and final step, is to chose the kind of license that more closely reflects the control you want to exercise over what it is that is legally possible for you to control. Although in all honesty, this is the step for which the paper offers the least information, but that’s because there are a bevy of extremely helpful resources already.

What’s best about this white paper is that it is an easy read, it’s well written, well organized, and well beyond the normal dry instruction manual issued to lull you to sleep before you can act. The real lesson here though is that none of this is as straightforward as we’d like to think and it’s going to be quite some time before that changes as so much of the ground covered by what is made possible through these technologies is really new territory.  So, if you are sitting on something that is going to make you the next millionaire, you might want to get some expert advice.

Getting Started with 3D Carving: Using Easel, X-Carve, and Carvey to Make Things with Acrylic, Wood, Metal, and More

3D printing has been the hot topic in the maker world for years now, but there’s another type of desktop manufacturing that’s become the go-to choice for anyone who needs durable results fast. Instead of slowly depositing layers of plastic, a 3D carver starts with a solid block of material and carves it away using a rotating metal bit. It’s faster than 3D printing, offers a wider choice of materials, and creates durable, permanent parts that look great. This book covers the basics of designing and making things with a 3D carver, and gives you several projects you can build yourself including a guitar, clock, earrings, and even a skateboard.

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